Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial

Photo Gallery

Bosque Redondo Memorial building, Visitor Center, Museum, and gift shop.Walkway entrance.The entrance to the Bosque Redondo Memorial.The entrance of the Bosque Redondo Memorial Exhibit.Annie Victor weaving at her loom.Navajo Indians from the Bosque Redondo Memorial mural ''Long Walk'' by artist Shonto Begayl.Bosque Redondo Memorial mural ''Long Walk'' by artist Shonto Begayl.Bosque Redondo Memorial mural ''Long Walk'' by artist Shonto Begayl.Bosque Redondo Memorial mural ''Long Walk'' by artist Shonto Begayl.Visitor viewing the museum's exhibit.Painting showing the Long Walk.Mary showing a table full of the supplies Navajo Indians would use to build their hunting gear.Portraits photographed in the 1860's of the Navajo people at Bosque Redondo.Indian pottery in the Bosque Redondo Memorial Exhibit.Bosque Redondo offers audio tours for their visitors.Churro SheepChurro SheepThe entrance to the Pecos River Nature Trail at Bosque Redondo.Pecos River can be seen along the Pecos River Nature Trail at Bosque Redondo.Commemoration of treaty spot. In 1971, Navajos placed rocks in remembrance of their ancestors at this commemorative.Commemoration of 1868 treaty. In 1971, Navajos placed rocks from their traditional lands in remembrance of their ancestors.Commemoration of 1868 treaty and Treaty Rock.The Treaty Rock near the Pecos River Nature Trail.Purple Silverleaf Nightshade Flower that grows along the Pecos River Nature Trail at Bosque Redondo in the summer.Wildflower that grows along the Pecos River Nature Trail at Bosque Redondo in the summer.The Pecos River Nature Trail at Bosque Redondo in the summer.Run off to the Pecos River that can be seen along the Pecos River Nature Trail.Weaving depicting the ''Long Walk'' Linda Nez, weaver. Private collection.An Apache boy at Bosque Redondo.The bank of the Pecos River at Bosque Redondo.Indian commissary and rear view of company quarters, Fort Sumner, New Mexico, Bosque Redondo area. Negative #001815 U.S. soldiers watch over Navajo and Apache peoples at Bosque Redondo. The Apache would leave in the following months, while the Navajo were permitted to return to their native lands. The round up and forced march of hundreds of thousands of Native Americans was one of the most tragic periods in New Mexico's histoy.Construction at Ft. Sumner, at the Bosque Redondo reservation. From the Center for Southwest Research, University Libraries, University of New Mexico.Navajo people at the Bosque Redondo reservation.Bosque Redondo Visitor's Center, designed by Navajo architect David Sloan to resemble a tepee.

Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial